5 Things To Know Before Your First Pilates Class

5 Things To Know Before Your First Pilates Class

Originally appeared on Self.com

The first time you take any new fitness class can be a little intimidating. But for some reason, Pilates classes have an extra air of “avoid this if you don’t know what you’re doing.” Maybe it’s the reformer, with its straps and springs. Maybe it’s the exercise names that you’ve never heard before (what’s this “Pilates 100” thing?)

If you’ve wanted to try Pilates classes but something has been holding you back, now’s your time to sign up for your first one. Pilates offers plenty of benefits to your body no matter your fitness background. You’ll improve your posture, focus on bodily alignment, and get one heck of a core workout.

Whether you’re on the mat or machine, you can snag the same benefits. A 2016 study found that eight weeks of Pilates classes improved abdominal endurance, flexibility, and balance. Plus, Pilates has seen a resurgence in popularity, with franchises such as Club Pilates popping up around the country.

Want to know what the hype is all about? Here’s everything a Pilates newbie needs to know to enjoy your first class.

Image: Heather Dorak

1. There are two different kinds of Pilates classes: mat classes and reformer classes.

You’re either tackling a class that’s based on a mat, which is a tad thicker than your standard yoga mat to cushion pressure points, or a machine called a reformer, which is a sliding platform complete with stationary foot bar, springs, and pulleys that provide resistance to help tone the body. Know which one you’re getting into before you commit to your workout, which is typically 45 minutes to an hour long.

Both options focus on the concept of control rather than cranking out endless reps or muscle exhaustion. In Pilates, your muscles are working to lift against gravity and (in the case of the reformer) the resistance of the springs or bands with the ultimate goal of strengthening and isolating the right muscles. Your goal should be to take your time with the exercises, focus on the task at hand, and connect to your breath.

“The reformer experience is maybe the most fun you’ll have in a Pilates class,” says Heather Andersen, founder of New York Pilates. “The machine gives you added resistance and a sliding surface that challenges your workout. It often feels like you’re flying or gliding.”

There are also many Pilates-inspired workouts like SLT, Brooklyn Bodyburn, and Studio MDR, which aren’t considered “classic” Pilates, but offer many of the same benefits. These next-level studios use a next-level reformer called a Megaformer, which is larger than a traditional reformer.

Regardless of what class you choose, make sure to let your instructor know you’re a beginner. This way, she’ll be able to keep an eye on you throughout the class and offer modifications or form adjustments.

2. You’ll feel your muscles burn during class, and you’ll probably be sore the next day.

While you may not be crushing high intensity exercises like squat jumps or lifting heavy dumbbells, the mostly bodyweight routines that Pilates classes offer can be pretty intense. Take the signature Pilates Hundred, for example. A core-focused move that involves less than two inches of constant movement, it will make your abs burn. A good instructor should give you modifications so that you can perform each movement with good form (another reason to introduce yourself as a beginner before class starts.)

Dedicating your entire focus to even the smallest movements means that you’ll work the muscles that each exercise intends. And that means you can be dealing with muscle soreness after your workout. Don’t fret: While next-day soreness may be at a whole new level after your first week, your body will get more used to the movements with time. Being sore the next day doesn’t mean you’re out of shape; it just means you’re challenging your muscles in new ways, or working muscle groups that don’t usually get much attention.

TO READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE, CLICK HERE. 

No Comments

Leave a Reply